The Dresden Letters – 7 : Moving House

Clonmany

28 July 1801

My dear Uncle (contd.)

I have a letter from Eliza and she says that all the party at Kilderry (Muff) are in perfect health and this gives me some hope of seeing them all here soon. Indeed I am sure my aunt will not leave the country without paying a  visit here which I hope may not have the same effect on her spirits that the last parting visit had. She has such a feeling heart and a kind and affectionate disposition that parting with us all, particularly my father, has painfully affected her. I was very sorry to hear that she my dear Eliza and the children are again to go to Athlone. The request I feel is very selfish as I know how much happier it will make you all to be together, but I cannot help, almost praying, that you may be removed to Armagh before the family set off for Athlone as I believe the north is much quieter. Edward, Catherine and little William left us today. There are so many of her relations coming to Culdaff that she could not remain longer with us. We feel very lonely after having them here three months. My father is not very well at present – that painful disorder in his kidneys has been very severe for a day or two but I hope may soon prove better. Arthur was to have left here on the 14th last but we have not yet heard of his arrival in Belfast. I suppose John has left you and if not,  I will give him my affectionate love, my mother’s also particularly (sic).  We were all delighted to see him so much improved. I shall have the comfort of seeing Henry and Charlotte whom I have not seen for two years. Good night my dear Uncle and excuse this effort to be written with the most abominable haste but my sight is not clear enough at night. My father, mother and aunt send their kindest love. 

Believe me your truly grateful and very affectionate Edward Chichester.

(The letter is rather incoherent in places but Rev. Chichester is coping with several emotions – family illness, departure of friends, transfers of loved ones to new and challenging duties and even personal unhappiness).

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2 thoughts on “The Dresden Letters – 7 : Moving House

  1. Very touching correspondence.Sounds as if his poor mother was suffering from cellulitis.A very painfull condition.At least today it can be treated with antibiotic,s.It makes you grateful for modern medicin.

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